hankrules2011

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Posts Tagged ‘Safehold’

A Review of Hell’s Foundations Quiver

Posted by Scott Holstad on October 22, 2015

Hell's Foundations Quiver (Safehold, #8)Hell’s Foundations Quiver by David Weber
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

WARNING: THIS REVIEW WILL CONTAIN A GREAT DEAL OF PROFANITY. IF YOU ARE OFFENDED BY PROFANITY, PLEASE DO NOT READ IT.

Hell’s Foundations Quiver (Safehold #8) was a fantastic book. But David Weber, the author, is a first class ASSHOLE and I’m getting really sick of this addictive fucking series he’s written. This is the fourth straight book with the war in Siddermark and with where the book ended, it’s clear to me that there will need to be between two and four more books before this war is concluded, if then. And that’s too goddamn much. Damn it, the first war was over in one book, the first. The second war, between Charis and Corisonde, was over in one book. Why the fuck can’t this fucking war be over in one fucking book??? Why the hell does it have to stretch over four fucking books, and now apparently many more? WTF? Weber is obviously a greedy fuck who has discovered that if you write 1,000 page books in such incredible detail from so many perspectives, you can draw a war out six or eight or 10 books and suckers like you and me will pay countless millions for them. Cause it’s admittedly an awesome story. In fact, it’s the best story I’ve ever read. That’s why I keep coming back to it, even with all the stupid names I resent so much and even with all of the phrases Weber has his characters repeat on virtually every other page until you want to bash your head into the wall. Countless reviewers have commented on how slow the plot is. Well, he’s slowed it down even more. Even though this book is probably the best Siddermark book in the series, and even though it’s full of action and battles, nothing really happens. There’s no progression. No resolution. Just a military stalement for yet another year, basically. So why write the fucking book at all? Because Weber wants to make bank, that’s why? Greedy prick! I’d love to tell that SOB off. He’s the most amazing writer, even with his bad, annoying habits, and can create the most amazing worlds, but damn, he manipulates his readers with his unbelievably slowed down and unresolved plots. Yes, it was good to see the vicars, the Group of Four, freaking out. Yes, it was good to see Charis and Siddermark settling some debts, militarily. Yes, it was damn good to see Merlin slaughter some bastard Army of God fanatics again. And, yes, like the ending of the last book, the ending of this book was pretty good, with Merlin appearing out of the blue before Earl Thirsk of Dohlar. Presumably in an attempt to save his life. And since this book began with where the previous book left off, it’s safe to assume the next one will too. (And the first chapter of this book was excellent!) But, dammit, do I have to wade through umpteen more battles I’ll never remember with newer weapons that barely progress technologically with lots of politics and religion and realistically nothing at all happening? Cause if I do, I’ll never read another fucking Weber novel again. I already hate his guts for doing all this shit to us. I already resent him for his obvious manipulations of his readers. Does he really have to string it out so damn long? And not only that, but when the war in Siddermark is finally over sometime in, oh, book 12 or so, will we FINALLY get to see Charis invade the Temple Lands and attack Zion and finally pay back the Group of Four like we all have been dying to see for the last eight books? When the hell is that going to happen? Or is Weber going to string that war out for five or eight books too? Cause if he does, I’ll be dead before this series is done and frankly, he’s no younger than me, so he might want to consider finishing the fucking series before he dies himself. Asshole. And what about getting humanity back to space? When the hell is that going to happen? In book 35? I mean, really? WTF? Weber started an excellent series and then got carried away and now he’s dug everyone a hole they’ll never get out of. What a cruel bastard. Honestly, if you read this book on its own merits, it’s a five star book. It’s really good. But you can’t do that. Because it’s part of the series and because it’s a big part of the war in Siddermark sub-series, which Weber has yet to come close to completing and I’m so damn pissed about that, I’m inclined to give the book one star. Because that’s what Weber deserves. So I’m compromising and giving it three undeserved stars. I guess if you’re reading the series and haven’t already given up, you’ll have to read this, so it’s recommended, but otherwise, give up now while you still can. Cause this series isn’t going to be over for the next 20 fucking years.

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A Review of Like A Mighty Army

Posted by Scott Holstad on September 25, 2015

Like a Mighty ArmyLike a Mighty Army by David Weber
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Boy, I really don’t know how I feel about this book or about this series anymore. On one hand, I love the series. It’s an awesome, epic story told by a fantastic writer. On the other, like so many other people, I’m getting so damn bitter about the author and his stupid manipulations of us, the readers he obviously holds in disdain, so he can sell a zillion more books. His books move at glacial paces, almost nothing of note ever happens, no progress ever gets made, we’re never much more further along in the story line than in the previous book(s). My God, at this rate, I’m easily going to die before the series ends!!! How in the world Weber expects to move from steam engines and breech loading rifles to plasma weapons and space ships to fight aliens in outer space in a few more books is beyond comprehension. It’s literally impossible at his pace. His books go at about one year per book. This was his seventh book. We’ve come seven years. We’ve gone from cannon balls to artillery shells. Wow. Impressive. Not. At the same time, the story is so amazing and so compelling, that you just want to know how everything is going to work out, what’s going to happen to Charis, to the Church, to Merlin, to the main characters. What’s going to happen??? I want to know, dammit!

This book is no different from the last book. We’re still fighting land battles in Siddarmark. However, at least, tides have turned from the last book and in this book Charisian forces are kicking the hell out of Church forces and their allies all over the Republic and it’s sweet justice to see. Additionally, there are two or three big plot twists, which should and probably will prove interesting in future books — all 45 of them, I’m sure — and the very end of the book is pretty cool and makes me want to read the next book immediately. And it isn’t due to be published until next month. Oh well.

The same problems exist in this book, only more so. The naming conventions are still a nightmare. Changing all the vowels to consonants is insane, but Weber does it, so you have names like Wyllyys and crap like that. And that’s an easy one. He likes to throw as many “y,” “z” and “r” letters into names as possible as replacements for “i” and “e,” etc., and it is enough to make you want to kill the man. Then again, if you’ve made it this far in the series, I guess you’re used to it. I’m still irritated at all of the titles though. Everyone is a baron, earl, prince, upper priest, vicar, bishop, duke, princess, etc, and adding that to the names is enough to drive anyone nuts. Then there are Weber’s pet phrases that he uses repeatedly. Everyone “snorts.” I’ve never seen so many people snort in my entire life. It’s fucking insane. Everyone, including the women and girls, “bare their teeth.” Um, excuse me? This is my pet peeve, I admit, cause I’ve mentioned this in reviews of previous books in this series, but WEBER, no one bares their fucking TEETH!!! Dogs bare their teeth. Wolves bare their teeth. HUMANS DO NOT BARE THEIR DAMN TEETH!!! And he has to have every character in the book do it at least three times on probably every other page through all 900+ pages throughout the book. I want to kill Weber for this alone. It’s brutal. To make matters worse, everyone — all of the bad guys and all of the good guys — do the following: when they are talking with people and, no matter how serious the topic, like they’re about to die in battle, they are for some reason possibly amused, their lips possibly “twitch.” Twitching lips. Oh my God! I must have read about twitching lips some 150 times in this book. Seriously, sometimes I wish Weber would have a fatal heart attack so I wouldn’t have to read this shit anymore cause as long as he writes these Safehold books, I’m going to read them, cursing his name the entire time. But as much as I resent him, I love these books so much. And I’m not the only one who feels this way. Go through the online reviews. Most reviewers feel like me. Most hate Weber for his naming conventions, for his plodding pace, for his making this into a 40 book series, for his overused phrases, but everyone says they have to keep reading because it’s such an amazing story and they have to find out what happens and it’s true. It is. And I do. I just wish I could sometime this century. I’m hoping the war in Siddarmark will end sometime in the next two or three books. That will mean it will only have taken five books to get through this damn war. Then we can move on to the Temple Lands and attack Zion and the Group of Four and unseat the Church. Sweet justice, then. Because of how this book ended, I’m anxious to begin the next one, as I said.

This book was good. There was plenty of action. A lot of battle action. A lot of tactics. Far too much about supply lines though. Far too much about gunpowder and the speed of bullets. Skip that crap, Weber, and cut down on the book’s size for our sake, please. Just get to the action. Weber can do a battle like no other. He’s a master. He just gets bogged down in the tactical details from all sides and it’s agonizing at times. Also, one of the faults of this book is that there are so many minor characters and so many chapters and sections opening with minor characters that you have no idea who they are or what army they’re with or who they fight for or anything until you’ve read a little while and it’s annoying. Speaking of characters, again, there are far too many. At the back of the book, there are at least 80 pages of characters listed in an index, which is insane. I have no idea how Weber keeps track of them. I certainly can’t. I’ve said this before, and so have many other people, but he seriously needs several editors, because he obviously has none. This is a five star book with three star problems, thus earning it four stars. Similar to several other Safehold books. I wish Weber would learn from his mistakes and/or listen to his readers. I guess he’s too arrogant for that since he’s obviously making tens of millions of dollars from us. If you’re reading the series, the book is obviously recommended. If you’re not, don’t read it; begin with the first book. You won’t understand it if you don’t.

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A Review of Midst Toil and Tribulation

Posted by Scott Holstad on September 10, 2015

Midst Toil and TribulationMidst Toil and Tribulation by David Weber
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Okay, I’m seriously pissed at the author, David Weber. I feel like he screwed me and every other reader over in a big way. What an ass!

In the last book of this Safehold series, the Church of God Awakening had led a rebellion in neighboring Siddarmark, resulting in the deaths of millions and a brutal civil war. Armies all over the world were poised to invade that country and the Church’s own army was going to invade, complete with its Inquisitors, who would torture and kill any “heretics” they found. Siddarmark was in deep, deep trouble. However, the Charisian Empire was about to come to its aid. Its army of some 80,000 troops was preparing to go to Siddarmark with superior weapons to stabilize the country and defend it against the invading armies.

Okay, that was the end of the last book. This book, Midst Toil and Tribulation, finds armies all over the world invading Siddarmark with zillions of casualties and countless atrocities. My paperback copy of the book is over 800 pages long. At the beginning of the book, the Charisian general is preparing, again, to take his army to Siddarmark to save it. And while I’m reading this book, I keep waiting for it to happen. And waiting and waiting. Meanwhile, the Temple Loyalists have an army of over 55,000 men, the Desnarians have a large army, the Dohlarians have a huge army of probably 100,000 troops, the Harchong Empire will be sending an army with over a MILLION troops, and the Church’s own army has about 120,000 troops. Siddarmark has some tens of thousands of troops left. Charis sends 7,500 troops to defend part of the country. 7,500. And they send 13,000 more for another defense. That’s it. So, all of what’s left of loyal Siddarmark people and their government are waiting for the main Charisian army to come to their aid. Of course, 80,000 troops don’t seem like much against the odds they’re facing, but they do have superior weapons and artillery, so who knows? The last 150 pages are pretty action packed and were real page turners, but as I got to about 100 pages left, I suddenly knew. I KNEW! In this book, the Charisian army NEVER SHOWS THE FUCK UP!!! That’s ALL that’s supposed to happen from the last book, dammit! That’s all that’s supposed to happen through the whole of this book. And it never fucking happens. Dammit! Weber is such a fucking asshole! Excuse my language, but I am SO SICK of him writing 800 page books only to be left with cliff hangers leading readers to have to wait for sequels, in this case, TWO sequels. Damn him! Will the fucking army even appear in the next fucking book? WTF??? Why is he such an asshole? He’s just making shitloads of money hand over fist from his readers who resent him, but who are addicted to the story, like me. I’m so pissed.

This was actually a five star book. Excellent book. But since the entire premise of the book never even occurred, that dropped the rating to about a two in my eyes. So I’m lavishly giving it four stars. Grudgingly.

In this book, we see the young prince of Corisonde and his older sister struggle with their spiritual life and be given generous terms by Charis. We also see the betrothal of Iyrs, the sister, to Emperor Cayleb’s adopted son, Hektor. However, that story line, which is interesting, is dropped halfway through the book, which also ticked me off.

We also see continued advances in technology and weapons, particularly with the invention of the steam engine. This results in the invention of something along the lines of an ironclad ship, which is used by the Charisians to devastating effect against the Temple Loyalists and the Church’s army. There’s a lot of action in this book, but a lot of it is redundant and becomes boring. How often can you see invading armies line up in force against Siddarmarkian pikemen who get butchered before you want to move on? Merlin plays more of a role in this book than in the last one, which is good. He has uploaded the late Nahrmann into a computerized VR world to continue acting in his spymaster capacity. He also struggles with his role in killing people. Apparently, even PICAs have a conscience. He’s tired of the killing, even though he knows he has to. The ironclads go up a canal and destroy all 57 locks, making it impossible for the Church’s army to support its troops, so action is effectively ended for a year, until the following spring. Maybe by then, the damn Charisian army will have come to Siddarmark. I don’t know. I halfway doubt it.

Weber’s a great writer with great story telling capabilities, but he takes his damn time, with each book in the series representing one year. At this rate, I doubt I’ll have finished the series and find out what happens by the time I die, and that pisses me off too. And he has many faults, some of which I’ve pointed out in previous Safehold reviews. They still exist in this book and probably in all future books. But the story is awesome and addictive. If only he would pick up the pace. Damn, is that too much to ask of the man? Recommended, grudgingly, but only if you’ve read the series in order beginning with the first one.

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A Review of How Firm a Foundation

Posted by Scott Holstad on August 28, 2015

How Firm a FoundationHow Firm a Foundation by David Weber
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Wow! Thank God. How Firm a Foundation is so much better than its predecessor, A Mighty Fortress. A huge improvement. This was a great book to read. It’s the fifth book in the Safehold series and Chiris is still fighting for its life against the evil Church of God Awakening. After the Church’s complete naval battle destruction at the hands of the Charisian Navy, the Group of Four realize they have to resort to other methods. Or at least Grand Inquisitor Clyntahn does. He’s an evil bastard, that one. He starts sending suicide bombers into Charis with horrible consequences. Thousands of people die. Merlin catches one before he can detonate, however, and they interrogate him and find out the Church’s strategy. Meanwhile, Clyntahn decides to assassinate Prince Daivyn, the child prince of Corisande, Charis’s defeated enemy that is now part of the Charisian Empire. Earl Coris, his protector, and his sister are in grave danger. They apply for asylum in Charis, are granted it, and Merlin is sent to get them out of their trap and bring them 180 miles to the river where members of the Charisian Navy and Marines will be waiting to get them out.

One of the really nasty things in the book is the torture and murders of the Charisian seamen captured in the naval battle in the last book by Earl Thirsk. He’s instructed to give them up to the Inquisition, which he’s appalled at as he knows what will happen to them, but he has no choice. What happens is gruesome. As a result, Charis announces that anyone found representing or fighting for the Inquisition will be executed on the spot. Personally, I thought they should have executed some of the 60,000 Church prisoners they had in retaliation, but Cayleb said he wasn’t interested in vengeance.

More cool weapons are introduced in the book, leading to a great naval battle (all of Weber’s naval battles are great), where Charis demolishes its opposition entirely. It’s pretty sweet to see. Also, more people, including Charis’s Inquisitor, are let in on the truth of Safehold and Merlin.

Empress Sharleyan survives an assassination attempt in Corisande, thanks to Merlin. It’s truly frightening, especially as she’s now a mother to the heir of the throne.

Clyntahn also finally goes after Siddarmark, getting his Inquisitor priests to lead massive uprisings against Charisian expatriates and the government, leading to tens of thousands of deaths and mass destabilization throughout the country. Just what Clyntahn has wanted for so long. He’s so evil. I hope that Siddarmark will join Charis in the next book as a mainland empire to go after the Temple Lands and attack the Church on their home territory. I think they will.

The positives of this book are that it reads a whole lot faster than the previous book, even the previous two books. The previous book was SO plodding, it just got boring at times. The only boring part of this book is the beginning, when you start with 40 pages of a storm at sea with a ship trying to survive it. It does nothing to advance the plot and I’m willing to bet all of the nautical terms are lost on most of the readers, including me. It’s frankly stupid. Additionally, it seems like there are fewer characters to keep track of and that’s refreshing. The last book had nearly 500 characters and that’s about 250 too many. The name spellings are still ridiculous and stupid, but I’m used to them by now, I guess, so I’m going with it. There’s a ton more action in this book than in the previous couple of books, especially the last one. That’s refreshing. The land rescue at the end of the book is especially a nice touch. Of course, this isn’t a stand alone book. You have to begin with the first one and read the series in order to know what’s happening. But it’s worth it. This series is so addictive, even with the many problems one encounters in it. My main problem is it moves at such a slow pace, overall, that I worry if it’ll ever finish before either I die or Weber dies, in which case I’ll never find out what the hell happens! Still, strongly recommended as part of the Safehold series.

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A Review of A Mighty Fortress

Posted by Scott Holstad on August 25, 2015

A Mighty FortressA Mighty Fortress by David Weber
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Oh.My.God. I can’t believe I finally finished this near-1200 page monster of a book! It was brutal at times. I usually try to write complete or thorough reviews after reading a book, but I’m afraid I won’t for this one. Just too damn long, too damn much. So, a short review for a long book.

This is the fourth book in Weber’s Safehold series. It’s not a standalone book. You need to start with the first one and read them in order to know what’s going on and who’s who. In this book, the Empire of Charis is still defending itself from the Church of God Awaiting, which intends to destroy Charis. Emperor Cayleb and Empress Sharleyan are splitting their time between Charis and Chisholm, although they spend most of this book in Chisholm. They also have their first child, a girl, so they have produced an heir to the throne.

The Church’s Group of Four (vicars), led by Grand Inquisitor Clyntahn, who is a raging insane maniac, decides to build a navy to attack Charis, so they pay the various mainland kingdoms to start building ships and armaments, as well as training seamen, for the attack. When they do attack, they will vastly outnumber Charis’s fleet and it could be brutal.

Speaking of the Charisian navy, it’s always been the best in the world, but the Dohlarians now have a navy of their own and they go out looking for Charisian galleons. And they kick the Charisians’ asses. Of course, it was a 38-4 ship advantage, so look at it however you want to, but it was the first time Charis has ever lost a naval battle and the mystique is tarnished.

Meanwhile, the conquered princedom of Corisonde is producing rebels. One rebel priest and his goons torture and murder a popular priest and Merlin, who we don’t see much of in this book, gives the authorities his location so that they can arrest he and his cronies and execute them. Of course, this infuriates the Group of Four. Additionally, there’s an uprising in the making in the northern section of the country, but it’s put down too.

The book drags in many places. It has slow plotting. It plods. It gets boring at times, for instance, when Coris has to go to Zion in the winter. That section could have been pared down by about 20 pages at least. There’s not much action. Until you get to the very end. The Church finally has its navy and is joined by Harchong’s puny navy, sailing to meet the Dohlar navy. Of course, because of Merlin and his technology, the Charisians know about this and they send most of their fleet to guard Chisholm, which they think is the intended destination. They also worry about the navies joining, because when that happens, there will be over 300 ships against Charis’s 97. Not good odds. High Admiral Bryahn Lock Island takes 25 Charisian galleons, some with new weapons, to attack the Church’s navy. It will be 25 Charisian ships against 130 Church ships. Terrible odds. The only thing he thinks he can do is to attack at night in a storm with driving rain, when the Church won’t be expecting an attack. And he does. And he obliterates the first 14 Church ships before sailing into the teeth of the Church navy, taking heavy fire and casualties. But he gets his ships in the midst of the Church’s navy and the galleons with the new weapons fire and a Church ship literally explodes! Everything they hit is blown to hell. It’s not much of a fight. Most Church ships surrender. Only nine get away. Ninety three are taken by Charis, which itself has only eight ships left. And they have 60,000 Church prisoners now. It’s a huge Charisian victory. Again. And that’s where the book ends. And I had to know what happened after that, so I immediately started reading the next one. Which is where I am now.

Still, problems exist with the book. The names are still freaking ridiculous! First, there are too many in this book to keep track of. There’s an index of them in the back of the book and I think there are close to 500 characters named in this book. That’s freaking cruel. There’s no way we can keep track of them all. Also, they all have titles! They’re Baron this, Earl that, Prince this, Vicar that, Duke this, Bishop that. It’s too much. And to make matters even worse, Weber writes the names in old English spelled phonetically so that the names are virtually unpronounceable and appear to look stupid as hell and interrupt the flow of the sentence or paragraph since you have to stop and try to figure out who or what this person is. It’s damned ridiculous! It’s insulting. It’s stupid. I’m used to it now, since I’ve read four of these, but I still hate it.

Additionally, Weber likes to use certain words and phrases over and over again, beating them into your head until you want to rip your eyes out. People are constantly “baring their teeth.” As I wrote in my review for the last book, Weber — no one bares their damn teeth, moron!!! Dogs bare their teeth. Wolves bare their teeth. People don’t bare their teeth. And certainly not multiple people on the same damn page. It ticks me off. He also likes to write that people “snort.” Constantly. It’s cute the first three dozen times he writes it, but after seeing it 100 times, you want to kill any character who freaking snorts. What are they — horses?

The book also moves at a glacial pace. I think it covers about 11 months, give or take. At this rate, publishing one book a year, maybe the series will be finished by the time I die??? It’s driving me insane. As everyone says, he needs an editor. Maybe three. Cause apparently he has none. They need to speed him up and cut down on the word count.

Weber is a talented writer. I have to be honest though, these books drive me crazy. The whole time I read them, I ask myself why I’m putting myself through this torture. But like many others, I’m addicted. It’s a good story and well told. Just slow as hell and from too many points of view. I want to know what happens next and what happens ultimately. I just don’t want to have to read 25 1000 page books to do it. This is a five star book in terms of quality that deserves three stars because of all of its faults and problems, so I’m giving it four stars. Cautiously recommended for those reading the series.

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A Review of By Heresies Distressed

Posted by Scott Holstad on August 10, 2015

By Heresies Distressed (Safehold, #3)By Heresies Distressed by David Weber

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

This is the third book in the epic Safehold saga series and like its predecessor, it has a 4.07 out of 5 rating on Goodreads, which is pretty good. However, you’ll find, as was the case with the previous book, that a lot of people don’t like it. And they have their reasons. I liked this book. For the most part. I think. But it also pissed me off. Because it was merely an obvious continuation of Book Two. It was a filler book in the series. And while the end of Book Two promised war between Charis and Corisande, and while we finally got that war in this book, that’s about all we got and in so getting, we only got two battles and even then, only parts of them. So I feel cheated. I feel screwed. And this book ends like the previous one did, with an ending that begs the reader to buy and read the next book in the series if you want to find out what happens. And that pisses me off. Whatever happened to stand alone books? Hell, whatever happened even to just trilogies? Now every author has to write a freakin’ series, and the only books that actually matter are the first and last ones and all the ones in between are filler. And these books are so damn long. 700 pages, 800 pages. I think the next one is 1100 pages. Weber seriously needs an editor or two. Obviously the publisher agreed to a contract with him that guaranteed he wouldn’t have one.

In this book, Cayleb and Sharleyan are now happily married and in love, but Cayleb has left Sharleyan to rule their combined empire while he leads his fleet to the conquest of Corisande. Meanwhile, Church Loyalists try a huge assassination attempt on her life, in which all but one of her guards are killed, but super android/AI Merlin rushes to save her life, which he does, and then she is made privy to his secret and the secret to her world and its history. Meanwhile, Mother Church’s Group of Four is plotting to destroy Charis and its empire, per usual. Different book, nothing changes. Corisande’s Prince Hektor is assassinated by the Church, hoping to spin it as Cayleb’s brutal murder scheme, even though he’s at war with Hektor and would have killed him anyway if he had caught him. By the end of the book, Corisande has surrendered to Charis and has been made part of the empire, but we’re made to believe there will be many rebellions to put down there. The occupation will be difficult. Hektor’s exiled daughter ends the book by vowing revenge on Cayleb and Sharleyan. End of story.

More problems. The naming conventions Weber employs remains brutally stupid, although I suppose I’m somewhat used to it now. However, phonetic spelling of names, hundreds of them, seems damned stupid. And in the back of each book, there is a character reference. In the back of this book, there are about 10 pages of characters, I believe over 300 of them. And they all have to have titles. Duke, Earl, Baron, Sir, Captain, Commodore, Prince, King, Vicar, Archbishop, etc. How the HELL are we supposed to remember all of these people, Weber??? Dumbass! He’s making a pretty penny off of us suckers and the thing that really grates my nerves are these stories are well told and darn addictive and now I have to read the next one to find out what happens with the Church’s efforts to build their own army and navy to attack Charis and with that empire’s occupation of Corisande, among other things. Damn you, Weber! I didn’t know whether to give this book three or four stars. I wanted to give it three because I was so freakin annoyed, but in the end, I’m giving it four because it is pretty well written and it does cover the war that was promised in Book Two. But don’t read this if you haven’t read the first two, in order. And I actually don’t recommend this book. Just because I’m addicted to the series doesn’t mean I think other people will be. Not recommended.

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